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Three dimensional bio-printing - establishing the future of personalised medicine approaches for women's cancers within SPHERE

Project Member(s): Chou, J., Marsh, D.

Funding or Partner Organisation: Maridulu Budyari Gumal - The Sydney Partnership for Health, Education, Research and Enterprise (SPHERE) (Academic Health Science Partnership AHSP - Clinical Academic Streams)
Maridulu Budyari Gumal - The Sydney Partnership for Health, Education, Research and Enterprise (SPHERE) (Academic Health Science Partnership AHSP - Clinical Academic Streams)

Start year: 2019

Summary: Hypothesis 3D bio-printed models of ovarian cancer can be developed and optimised to inform treatment choices for women with ovarian cancer based on a personalised medicine approach. Aims (1) To use ovarian cancer cell line models available in the Marsh and Ford laboratories to establish the fundamental requirements for 3D bio-printing of ovarian cancer cells using CELLINK Bioprinters available in the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology (FEIT). This will include optimisation of bioinks and determination of cells for co-culture, as well as the introduction of primary ovarian cancer cells once conditions are optimised. (2) To challenge 3D bio-printed ovarian cancer cell cultures of known molecular status and responsiveness to cisplatin with chemotherapeutic platin drugs and taxol, as well as the molecular target PARP inhibitor drugs. Further, to determine optimal methods for measurement of response. Methods Ovarian cancer cell line models are available in the Marsh and Ford laboratories.The genetic make-up, including mutations in key genes that function in HR, is known for most of these cell lines. We also have access to primary tumour samples that can be cultured for direct 3D bio-printing through the Kolling Institute Tumour Bank. We will use the CELLINK 3D bio-printers based in FEIT, UTS. Multiple bio-inks and conditions will be tested in order to optimise spheroid formation in cell lines and primary tumour samples. As previously performed by CI Ford, co-cultures of ovarian cancer cells will be trialled, e.g. with fibroblast cells and/or mesothelial cells to better mimic the ovarian tumour microenvironment in a 3D bio-printed setting. Once conditions have been optimised for 3D bio-printing, functional assays will be undertaken to determine the best measures to drug response. Concentrations of drugs such as PARP inhibitors will be informed by previous work undertaken in 2D culture models in the Marsh laboratory.

FOR Codes: Biomedical Engineering, Medical Biotechnology, Medical Instruments